Vitamin "I"
officialfrenchtoast:

"gonna sell these kids some drugs"

officialfrenchtoast:

"gonna sell these kids some drugs"

2headedsnake:

Karina Smigla-Bobinski,  ‘Ada’, a large helium filled ball covered in charcoal nubs. The piece floats gently in space until interacted with by viewers, who can toss the ball against the walls, creating scratchy drawings on the surface of the gallery space. During the course of the exhibition, the walls  evolve into a dense collection of scribbles.

videoisvideo:

kunstlerroman:

A gecko utilizing claws on their feet to defy gravity. 

videoisvideo:

kunstlerroman:

A gecko utilizing claws on their feet to defy gravity. 

archiemcphee:

Portuguese artist Victor Nunes sees the potential for faces just about everywhere he looks - in pieces of food and inanimate objects alike. And wherever he sees that potential he makes them appear, whether that requires drawing, molding, painting or sculpting. 

You can check out lots more of Victor’s delightful artwork via his Facebook page Victor Nunes Faces.

[via Blazenfluff]

greatest picture.

greatest picture.

kingcheddarxvii:

dogs aren’t too complicated but they think they are comics

maddieonthings:

👉🌵

maddieonthings:

👉🌵

tastefullyoffensive:

Dogs are such majestic creatures. [x]

animals-riding-animals:

toad riding toad riding toad riding toad riding toad

animals-riding-animals:

toad riding toad riding toad riding toad riding toad

prostheticknowledge:

Computers Watching Movies

Art project by Benjamin Grosser utilizes computer vision and tracking to visualize points of interest, demonstrated with six popular films. The gifs above are sped-up versions of The Matrix (top) and 2001: A Space Odyssey (bottom):

Computers Watching Movies shows what a computational system sees when it watches the same films that we do. The work illustrates this vision as a series of temporal sketches, where the sketching process is presented in synchronized time with the audio from the original clip. Viewers are provoked to ask how computer vision differs from their own human vision, and what that difference reveals about our culturally-developed ways of looking. Why do we watch what we watch when we watch it? Will a system without our sense of narrative or historical patterns of vision watch the same things?

Computers Watching Movies was computationally produced using software written by the artist. This software uses computer vision algorithms and artificial intelligence routines to give the system some degree of agency, allowing it to decide what it watches and what it does not. Six well-known clips from popular films are used in the work, enabling many viewers to draw upon their own visual memory of a scene when they watch it. The scenes are from the following movies: 2001: A Space Odyssey, American Beauty, Inception, Taxi Driver, The Matrix, and Annie Hall.

Below is an embedded video of the exhibition cut - you can see seperate parts at Benjamin’s website:

More information and videos can be found at Benjamin’s project page here